expecttheunexpectedtoday:

expecttheunexpectedtoday

c.1920 - Radio Set / fine cut and engraved glasswork 
by second-generation glass artist Thomas Taylor Hunt 

-Corning Museum of Glass-

expecttheunexpectedtoday:

expecttheunexpectedtoday

c.1920 - Radio Set / fine cut and engraved glasswork
by second-generation glass artist Thomas Taylor Hunt

-Corning Museum of Glass-

(via hifructosemag)

retrogasm:

Happy Easter

retrogasm:

Happy Easter

meganleppla:

Bookbinding
Why?Bookbinding let’s you stitch your stories together. Like papermaking, bookbinding has a long history of being an excellent resource for recording thoughts. To bind a book you simply need to attach pages together. Stitching techniques can be as decorative as you’d like, or as simple as a staple. Binding your own book means you can bind your own sketchbook, and no artist should be without a sketchbook.
What else?Bookbinding gets us thinking about the sequence of things – the cover, the beginning, the middle, and the end of the book. Construct your own narrative of a real (or imagined!) event by writing, illustrating, and binding your story. More curriculum connectors can be found here.

meganleppla:

Bookbinding

Why?
Bookbinding let’s you stitch your stories together. Like papermaking, bookbinding has a long history of being an excellent resource for recording thoughts. To bind a book you simply need to attach pages together. Stitching techniques can be as decorative as you’d like, or as simple as a staple. Binding your own book means you can bind your own sketchbook, and no artist should be without a sketchbook.

What else?
Bookbinding gets us thinking about the sequence of things – the cover, the beginning, the middle, and the end of the book. Construct your own narrative of a real (or imagined!) event by writing, illustrating, and binding your story. More curriculum connectors can be found here.

asker

Anonymous asked: hey, so i already did the art school thing and have been applying to places and it's been two years since graduating with no luck whatsoever. I work a shitty job to pay rent and dunno, just getting really tired of it- any advice for someone trying to break into storyboarding? thanks.

neo-rama:

i got out of school in 2005. i worked retail on and off until a few years ago. in the mean time i made comics and drew a lot. it can be really frustrating living paycheck to paycheck and seeing no end in sight. the path is different for everyone. keep drawing and share your work with the people that inspire you and your peers. hopefully you’ll be able to work on a project that has meaning for you. that doesn’t always happen, tho. it may happen soon, it may happen later. don’t be afraid to make changes in your life in order to survive. 

i guess the best thing to do now is to tell stories. make comics. work on your writing. draw and write about things that are important to you. it’ll help you build a strong voice. good luck :T

gairo:

140402_040_5D3_1454 (by oda.shinsuke)

gairo:

140402_040_5D3_1454 (by oda.shinsuke)

athleticsistas:

Maggie Watson

athleticsistas:

Maggie Watson

(via fitandmuscularwomen)

mingdoyle:

My variant cover for WHAT IF: AGE OF ULTRON #5Tons of tiny Ant-Men! Hup hup hup hup! 

I also did most of the interior of this book, and you’ll be able to pick it up on 4/23. This will be my second time working with radical wordsmith Joe Keatinge, after last month’s Adventures of Superman #46I also had the pleasure of teaming up with super-editor Jon Moisan, who’s got Hawkeye beat on the eagle eyes!

Special thanks to Joe Quinones for brainstorming a bunch of ideas for this cover with me! He’s a wizard of imagination. Here are some more cute/creepy concepts we concocted. :)

(via robot6)